_roomonfire

R o o m o n F i r e

curated by chloë mccarthy | interiors + staging
info@roomonfire.net
#roomonfire
profile artwork by ron gilad

A subtle, contemporary renovation for the Swiss National Museum’s Ruhmeshalle (Hall of Fame) by Christ & Gantenbein Architects photographed by Schweizerische Landesmuseen.

A subtle, contemporary renovation for the Swiss National Museum’s Ruhmeshalle (Hall of Fame) by Christ & Gantenbein Architects photographed by Schweizerische Landesmuseen. - 2 days ago

1,450 Likes
3 Comments
0
The @jamesperse EC-01 Private Estate in Mexico’s Cabo San Lucas. The full-service residence located on a private beach is owned by James Perse, known for his brand of West Coast-inspired clothing. The palapa-style home features five suites, an infinity pool, a spa, an open-air fitness studio and comes with a dedicated butler and chef as well as an on-site James Perse store.

The @jamesperse EC-01 Private Estate in Mexico’s Cabo San Lucas. The full-service residence located on a private beach is owned by James Perse, known for his brand of West Coast-inspired clothing. The palapa-style home features five suites, an infinity pool, a spa, an open-air fitness studio and comes with a dedicated butler and chef as well as an on-site James Perse store. - 3 days ago

2,694 Likes
25 Comments
1
Apartment renovation in Amsterdam by @frmwrkstudio photographed by @kasiagatkowskaphotography |

From the architects: “Within Amsterdam’s financial district lies a mapped zone of skyscraper office blocks and apartments, as well as a growing number of landmark buildings that has recently become home to spearheading expats and locals. 
Here Framework Studio crafted for a family with a strong eye for design and sustainability, a layout and interiors that would enhance the space’s potential rather than try to fight it. At the heart of the construction is a spiral staircase that swirls down from the roof to the ground floor like cascading silk. This became the focal point for the rest of the project, not only to connect the floors but to diffuse light throughout the house allowing the space to feel open and simultaneously private. 
Framework’s trademark is the passion for creating comfortable homes that enhance the client’s lifestyle. And that is evident all around this project, from the softness of the materials used in the interior – plaster walls, a mix of hardwood and terracotta floors – to custom made furniture and auction finds.”

Apartment renovation in Amsterdam by @frmwrkstudio photographed by @kasiagatkowskaphotography | From the architects: “Within Amsterdam’s financial district lies a mapped zone of skyscraper office blocks and apartments, as well as a growing number of landmark buildings that has recently become home to spearheading expats and locals. Here Framework Studio crafted for a family with a strong eye for design and sustainability, a layout and interiors that would enhance the space’s potential rather than try to fight it. At the heart of the construction is a spiral staircase that swirls down from the roof to the ground floor like cascading silk. This became the focal point for the rest of the project, not only to connect the floors but to diffuse light throughout the house allowing the space to feel open and simultaneously private. Framework’s trademark is the passion for creating comfortable homes that enhance the client’s lifestyle. And that is evident all around this project, from the softness of the materials used in the interior – plaster walls, a mix of hardwood and terracotta floors – to custom made furniture and auction finds.” - 6 days ago

2,142 Likes
27 Comments
2
Bismark house in Sydney’s Bondi by @andrewburges architects photographed by @prueruscoe | Named after the palm that the house gently curves around, the design of this semi-detached home was organised around the laneway facade.

Bismark house in Sydney’s Bondi by @andrewburges architects photographed by @prueruscoe | Named after the palm that the house gently curves around, the design of this semi-detached home was organised around the laneway facade. - 8 days ago

3,298 Likes
32 Comments
3
The living room in architect @vincentvanduysen’s own apartment in Antwerp, Belgium designed in 1993 |
From the architects: “This 3rd floor loft apartment in a former spices and rubber storehouse was VVD’s home in Antwerpen when he first set up practice after years of working abroad. It has formed a fertile background for experiments in creating his trademark meditative and sensual atmosphere, researching materials and details, and has also been the stage for his own furniture designs. 
The layout of the original apartment is slung around an internal lightwell, that has 3 glazed sides from which to borrow light. Another unusual feature is the long and narrow living room, of which 2 walls have generous astragal windows onto an unexciting urban fabric.
The original plan, although quite divided up into proper rooms, retains a certain flow , as most rooms have internal glazed screens and uninterrupted views into adjacent spaces. A little lightwell at the back of the plan provides fresh air and light whenever required and again ties the space together between the party walls.
These original elements have been left untouched by the architect, who has simply sought to enhance them by carefully selecting methods of screening unwanted views and retaining privacy. The existing wooden floors were sanded and left unfinished, the parquet and mosaic floors restored, walls coloured with a very limited warm pallet. In addition to this, the carefully selected rugs, textiles, objets trouvés and pieces of furniture create a language that belongs completely to VVD. Over the years this language has become slightly more refined perhaps, the furniture has become more taut and geometric, but always stayed true to the essential qualities of a home for living in; to create a feeling of warmth, light and wellbeing.” —
Photo by
@giorgiopossentiphotography

The living room in architect @vincentvanduysen ’s own apartment in Antwerp, Belgium designed in 1993 | From the architects: “This 3rd floor loft apartment in a former spices and rubber storehouse was VVD’s home in Antwerpen when he first set up practice after years of working abroad. It has formed a fertile background for experiments in creating his trademark meditative and sensual atmosphere, researching materials and details, and has also been the stage for his own furniture designs. The layout of the original apartment is slung around an internal lightwell, that has 3 glazed sides from which to borrow light. Another unusual feature is the long and narrow living room, of which 2 walls have generous astragal windows onto an unexciting urban fabric. The original plan, although quite divided up into proper rooms, retains a certain flow , as most rooms have internal glazed screens and uninterrupted views into adjacent spaces. A little lightwell at the back of the plan provides fresh air and light whenever required and again ties the space together between the party walls. These original elements have been left untouched by the architect, who has simply sought to enhance them by carefully selecting methods of screening unwanted views and retaining privacy. The existing wooden floors were sanded and left unfinished, the parquet and mosaic floors restored, walls coloured with a very limited warm pallet. In addition to this, the carefully selected rugs, textiles, objets trouvés and pieces of furniture create a language that belongs completely to VVD. Over the years this language has become slightly more refined perhaps, the furniture has become more taut and geometric, but always stayed true to the essential qualities of a home for living in; to create a feeling of warmth, light and wellbeing.” — Photo by @giorgiopossentiphotography - 10 days ago

1,339 Likes
2 Comments
2
ON THE JOURNAL : Richard Found’s country home in the Cotswolds | From the architects: “@FoundAssociates, as residential architect, designed this contextual country house consisting of a restored and updated gamekeeper’s cottage and an innovative series of fresh, inter-connected pavilions tucked into the landscape immediately behind it. Together, they form an inviting rural escape set within a secret valley on the edge of the Cotswolds, surrounded by woodland.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The original Grade II listed cottage – dating from the 18th century – remains an integral part of the property, chiefly used by visiting family and friends. The combination of three single-storey pavilions dramatically extends the available living space, with an open plan living area to one side, bedrooms to the other and a linking zone at the centre.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
These new-build elements offer a striking contrast between the mass of concrete and local stone used in their construction and expanses of glass that frame select views of the landscape and open onto adjoining terraces. A planted green roof over the pavilions softens the impact of the new structures upon the landscape.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The house won a RIBA National Award and was nominated for the Manser Medal.”

ON THE JOURNAL : Richard Found’s country home in the Cotswolds | From the architects: “@FoundAssociates , as residential architect, designed this contextual country house consisting of a restored and updated gamekeeper’s cottage and an innovative series of fresh, inter-connected pavilions tucked into the landscape immediately behind it. Together, they form an inviting rural escape set within a secret valley on the edge of the Cotswolds, surrounded by woodland. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The original Grade II listed cottage – dating from the 18th century – remains an integral part of the property, chiefly used by visiting family and friends. The combination of three single-storey pavilions dramatically extends the available living space, with an open plan living area to one side, bedrooms to the other and a linking zone at the centre. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ These new-build elements offer a striking contrast between the mass of concrete and local stone used in their construction and expanses of glass that frame select views of the landscape and open onto adjoining terraces. A planted green roof over the pavilions softens the impact of the new structures upon the landscape. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The house won a RIBA National Award and was nominated for the Manser Medal.” - 15 days ago

1,792 Likes
21 Comments
1
Richard Found’s country home in the Cotswolds embraces an 18th-century heritage listed cottage | From the architects: “@FoundAssociates, as residential architect, designed this contextual country house consisting of a restored and updated gamekeeper’s cottage and an innovative series of fresh, inter-connected pavilions tucked into the landscape immediately behind it. Together, they form an inviting rural escape set within a secret valley on the edge of the Cotswolds, surrounded by woodland.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The original Grade II listed cottage – dating from the 18th century – remains an integral part of the property, chiefly used by visiting family and friends. The combination of three single-storey pavilions dramatically extends the available living space, with an open plan living area to one side, bedrooms to the other and a linking zone at the centre.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
These new-build elements offer a striking contrast between the mass of concrete and local stone used in their construction and expanses of glass that frame select views of the landscape and open onto adjoining terraces. A planted green roof over the pavilions softens the impact of the new structures upon the landscape.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The house won a RIBA National Award and was nominated for the Manser Medal.”

Richard Found’s country home in the Cotswolds embraces an 18th-century heritage listed cottage | From the architects: “@FoundAssociates , as residential architect, designed this contextual country house consisting of a restored and updated gamekeeper’s cottage and an innovative series of fresh, inter-connected pavilions tucked into the landscape immediately behind it. Together, they form an inviting rural escape set within a secret valley on the edge of the Cotswolds, surrounded by woodland. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The original Grade II listed cottage – dating from the 18th century – remains an integral part of the property, chiefly used by visiting family and friends. The combination of three single-storey pavilions dramatically extends the available living space, with an open plan living area to one side, bedrooms to the other and a linking zone at the centre. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ These new-build elements offer a striking contrast between the mass of concrete and local stone used in their construction and expanses of glass that frame select views of the landscape and open onto adjoining terraces. A planted green roof over the pavilions softens the impact of the new structures upon the landscape. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The house won a RIBA National Award and was nominated for the Manser Medal.” - 16 days ago

1,544 Likes
6 Comments
1
The contemporary design of architect Richard Found’s country home in the Cotswolds embraces an 18th-century heritage listed cottage | From the architects: “@FoundAssociates, as residential architect, designed this contextual country house consisting of a restored and updated gamekeeper’s cottage and an innovative series of fresh, inter-connected pavilions tucked into the landscape immediately behind it. Together, they form an inviting rural escape set within a secret valley on the edge of the Cotswolds, surrounded by woodland.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The original Grade II listed cottage – dating from the 18th century – remains an integral part of the property, chiefly used by visiting family and friends. The combination of three single-storey pavilions dramatically extends the available living space, with an open plan living area to one side, bedrooms to the other and a linking zone at the centre.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
These new-build elements offer a striking contrast between the mass of concrete and local stone used in their construction and expanses of glass that frame select views of the landscape and open onto adjoining terraces. A planted green roof over the pavilions softens the impact of the new structures upon the landscape.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The house won a RIBA National Award and was nominated for the Manser Medal.”

The contemporary design of architect Richard Found’s country home in the Cotswolds embraces an 18th-century heritage listed cottage | From the architects: “@FoundAssociates , as residential architect, designed this contextual country house consisting of a restored and updated gamekeeper’s cottage and an innovative series of fresh, inter-connected pavilions tucked into the landscape immediately behind it. Together, they form an inviting rural escape set within a secret valley on the edge of the Cotswolds, surrounded by woodland. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The original Grade II listed cottage – dating from the 18th century – remains an integral part of the property, chiefly used by visiting family and friends. The combination of three single-storey pavilions dramatically extends the available living space, with an open plan living area to one side, bedrooms to the other and a linking zone at the centre. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ These new-build elements offer a striking contrast between the mass of concrete and local stone used in their construction and expanses of glass that frame select views of the landscape and open onto adjoining terraces. A planted green roof over the pavilions softens the impact of the new structures upon the landscape. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The house won a RIBA National Award and was nominated for the Manser Medal.” - 16 days ago

620 Likes
3 Comments
1
Custom terrazzo stairs in the @oldceline stores by @caspermuellerkneer architects.

Custom terrazzo stairs in the @oldceline stores by @caspermuellerkneer architects. - 28 days ago

5,565 Likes
32 Comments
2
JJM House in
Grez-Doiceau, Belgium by @nicolasschuybroek, 2015 — 2017 photographed by @koenvandamme.

JJM House in Grez-Doiceau, Belgium by @nicolasschuybroek , 2015 — 2017 photographed by @koenvandamme. - 30 days ago

1,322 Likes
7 Comments
2
The Antonio Teofilo Residence by Decio Tozzi | An abundance of plants and colourful tiles brighten up this 1974 Brutalist concrete loft, designed by Decio Tozzi in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Antonio Teofilo Residence by Decio Tozzi | An abundance of plants and colourful tiles brighten up this 1974 Brutalist concrete loft, designed by Decio Tozzi in Sao Paulo, Brazil. - 1 month ago

3,743 Likes
16 Comments
0
Barry and Sheryl Schwartz's Great Escape in Santa Barbara designed by @clementsdesign |
For the @calvinklein cofounder and his wife, paradise is a serene beachfront home set on a dazzling site in California - “The running joke throughout the project was that they were building a “cozy little beach shack.” Barry Schwartz, the cofounder of the Calvin Klein fashion empire, and Sheryl, his wife of more than 50 years, had rented a surfside getaway in Santa Barbara, California, for roughly a decade when they acquired the plot of land next door to craft their own slice of paradise. “This beach is an absolute jewel, something truly special,” Sheryl says of the spectacular oceanfront location. “You can’t help but fall under its spell.” In short order, the couple assembled a design team up to the task of conjuring an idyllic home worthy of the site and its myriad allurements. That roster included architect Howard Backen of Backen & Gillam, interior designers Kathleen and Tommy Clements of Clements Design, and landscape architect Mark Rios of RCH Studios. “It should be glamorous yet inviting, with lots of places to read and enjoy a quiet moment,” Sheryl recalls of her mandate to the team. “She wanted the procession through the property to be very dramatic. When you reach a certain point, the ocean simply takes over,” Backen says, describing the jaw-dropping 40-foot-wide, column-free expanse that connects the living/dining room with the sublime natural vista just beyond. The architect’s axial arrangement leads visitors past a monumental entry gate designed by Ingrid Donat, through a richly landscaped courtyard, into the house’s voluminous social space, and from there out to the intoxicating embrace of the terrace and ocean view.” Via @archdigest. Words by @mayer.rus. Photography by @wabranowicz. Styled by @amykchin.

Barry and Sheryl Schwartz's Great Escape in Santa Barbara designed by @clementsdesign | For the @calvinklein cofounder and his wife, paradise is a serene beachfront home set on a dazzling site in California - “The running joke throughout the project was that they were building a “cozy little beach shack.” Barry Schwartz, the cofounder of the Calvin Klein fashion empire, and Sheryl, his wife of more than 50 years, had rented a surfside getaway in Santa Barbara, California, for roughly a decade when they acquired the plot of land next door to craft their own slice of paradise. “This beach is an absolute jewel, something truly special,” Sheryl says of the spectacular oceanfront location. “You can’t help but fall under its spell.” In short order, the couple assembled a design team up to the task of conjuring an idyllic home worthy of the site and its myriad allurements. That roster included architect Howard Backen of Backen & Gillam, interior designers Kathleen and Tommy Clements of Clements Design, and landscape architect Mark Rios of RCH Studios. “It should be glamorous yet inviting, with lots of places to read and enjoy a quiet moment,” Sheryl recalls of her mandate to the team. “She wanted the procession through the property to be very dramatic. When you reach a certain point, the ocean simply takes over,” Backen says, describing the jaw-dropping 40-foot-wide, column-free expanse that connects the living/dining room with the sublime natural vista just beyond. The architect’s axial arrangement leads visitors past a monumental entry gate designed by Ingrid Donat, through a richly landscaped courtyard, into the house’s voluminous social space, and from there out to the intoxicating embrace of the terrace and ocean view.” Via @archdigest. Words by @mayer.rus. Photography by @wabranowicz. Styled by @amykchin. - 2 months ago

1,932 Likes
16 Comments
3
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