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Adobe Photoshop Lightroom

The theme of the month is #Lr_Texture . Submit your photos to the hashtag for the chance to be featured. 👀

Hey everyone, @benjamin_warde here, welcome back to #LightroomLessons. Swipe through today’s mini-tutorial to learn how to quickly and easily find the photo that you’re looking for in Lightroom, without having to bother doing any organization up front.
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Step 1:
I knew I had this jellyfish photo that I wanted to share with you guys. But I took it a while ago, and scrolling through my 29,725 photos trying to find it would just make me crazy.  And of course I always mean to organize my photos, but I never do (taking pictures and editing pictures is a lot more fun that organizing pictures…). So how do I find this jellyfish picture if I’ve never bothered to tag it with a keyword or put it in an album? Simple! First, tap on “All Photos”.
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Step 2:
Tap on the magnifying glass to open the search field.
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Step 3:
Then just type in whatever you’re looking for (in this case I typed “jellyfish”) and tap “search”! Remember, you don’t need to have assigned any keywords to photos or anything like that. Lightroom simply performs image analysis to find the thing you’re looking for.
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Step 4:
That’s more like it! My 29,725 photos have been narrowed down to the 140 photos in which Lightroom found a jellyfish. Now it’s much simpler to scroll through and find the one I’m looking for. Give this a try on your own photos: search for something like “dog” or “mountain” or even abstract concepts like “love”. Note that Lightroom organizes the search results by confidence - results at the top are photos that Lightroom is pretty sure contain the thing you’re looking for, results near the bottom are photos that Lightroom is less certain about.

Hey everyone, @benjamin_warde here, welcome back to #LightroomLessons . Swipe through today’s mini-tutorial to learn how to quickly and easily find the photo that you’re looking for in Lightroom, without having to bother doing any organization up front. • Step 1: I knew I had this jellyfish photo that I wanted to share with you guys. But I took it a while ago, and scrolling through my 29,725 photos trying to find it would just make me crazy.  And of course I always mean to organize my photos, but I never do (taking pictures and editing pictures is a lot more fun that organizing pictures…). So how do I find this jellyfish picture if I’ve never bothered to tag it with a keyword or put it in an album? Simple! First, tap on “All Photos”. • Step 2: Tap on the magnifying glass to open the search field. • Step 3: Then just type in whatever you’re looking for (in this case I typed “jellyfish”) and tap “search”! Remember, you don’t need to have assigned any keywords to photos or anything like that. Lightroom simply performs image analysis to find the thing you’re looking for. • Step 4: That’s more like it! My 29,725 photos have been narrowed down to the 140 photos in which Lightroom found a jellyfish. Now it’s much simpler to scroll through and find the one I’m looking for. Give this a try on your own photos: search for something like “dog” or “mountain” or even abstract concepts like “love”. Note that Lightroom organizes the search results by confidence - results at the top are photos that Lightroom is pretty sure contain the thing you’re looking for, results near the bottom are photos that Lightroom is less certain about. - 3 hours ago

7,454 Likes
20 Comments
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Photos by @gunnerstahl.us || For our final #BlackHistoryMonth artist spotlight, we’re honoring the ambitious Gunner Stahl.
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For Gunner, #BlackHistoryMonth signifies so much more than what he learned in school when he was growing up. Watching a video of Martin Luther King Jr. 's “ I Have a Dream” speech and learning about the Underground Railroad are vitally important to understanding black history, but Gunner is convinced that it should go further.
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Through his art and his actions, Gunner aims to push the importance of speaking on what it could be, while being honest about black representation across the board. As the world evolves, so will photography, as it is shaped by and around black culture. It is artists like Gunner, with ambition and desire for accurate representation, who will ultimately evolve the nature of Black History Month, and how we, as observers, understand it. Read more about Gunner, Sheila, and Deborah at the link in bio.

Photos by @gunnerstahl.us || For our final #BlackHistoryMonth artist spotlight, we’re honoring the ambitious Gunner Stahl. • For Gunner, #BlackHistoryMonth signifies so much more than what he learned in school when he was growing up. Watching a video of Martin Luther King Jr. 's “ I Have a Dream” speech and learning about the Underground Railroad are vitally important to understanding black history, but Gunner is convinced that it should go further. • Through his art and his actions, Gunner aims to push the importance of speaking on what it could be, while being honest about black representation across the board. As the world evolves, so will photography, as it is shaped by and around black culture. It is artists like Gunner, with ambition and desire for accurate representation, who will ultimately evolve the nature of Black History Month, and how we, as observers, understand it. Read more about Gunner, Sheila, and Deborah at the link in bio. - 6 hours ago

9,200 Likes
25 Comments
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#Lr_Texture photo by @ashwalkernz || This photo was taken during my first visit to the Muriwai Gannet Colony in Auckland, New Zealand. Around 1200 of them nest here from August to March, their nests are arranged with satisfyingly neat precision in the limited space on the cliff and a couple of nearby rocky islands.
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It was a moody day with low clouds and strong winds. The sea was rough, and the birds were energetic. It was fascinating to watch the gannets soaring, crash landing and bickering—I could have watched for hours. The patterns they made on the cliff were incredible and the contrast of the swirling sea was beautiful.

#Lr_Texture photo by @ashwalkernz || This photo was taken during my first visit to the Muriwai Gannet Colony in Auckland, New Zealand. Around 1200 of them nest here from August to March, their nests are arranged with satisfyingly neat precision in the limited space on the cliff and a couple of nearby rocky islands. • It was a moody day with low clouds and strong winds. The sea was rough, and the birds were energetic. It was fascinating to watch the gannets soaring, crash landing and bickering—I could have watched for hours. The patterns they made on the cliff were incredible and the contrast of the swirling sea was beautiful. - 2 days ago

26,891 Likes
73 Comments
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#Lr_Texture photo by @marcorama || During my summer holiday to Denmark, I went to photograph the new area Ørestad, known for its beautiful architecture.

#Lr_Texture photo by @marcorama || During my summer holiday to Denmark, I went to photograph the new area Ørestad, known for its beautiful architecture. - 3 days ago

35,260 Likes
127 Comments
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#Lr_Texture photo by @trystane || The market is only open Thursday to Sunday, from 5pm to midnight. My local friends took me to a parking lot, where I snapped this image. I really love the Southeast Asian vibes of this place: vibrant and crowded.

#Lr_Texture photo by @trystane || The market is only open Thursday to Sunday, from 5pm to midnight. My local friends took me to a parking lot, where I snapped this image. I really love the Southeast Asian vibes of this place: vibrant and crowded. - 4 days ago

38,651 Likes
99 Comments
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@iw.wm is stone-stepping through Spanish mountain ranges like it’s nothing. We love to see it. 🏃 ⛰ #Lr_PhotoHunt

@iw.wm is stone-stepping through Spanish mountain ranges like it’s nothing. We love to see it. 🏃 ⛰ #Lr_PhotoHunt - 7 days ago

41,982 Likes
169 Comments
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Photos by @shepreebright || Admittedly on the shy side, Sheila was initially drawn to photography due to her own introverted tendencies because it allows her to speak what she sees. When she began photographing The Black Lives Matter movement in 2014, she knew that she was mainly capturing protest imagery, but “wanted to take people beyond that, to show the universal commonalities of all people,” race aside. This proved to be a challenge though, as she found that if a photo features a black person, people cannot “get past the blackness”, even though “we all bleed the same, we all have fear.”⁠⠀
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This underbelly of universal acceptance is found in all of her work, as she is in a continual pursuit to get us to come together, despite division into our own countless, personal protests. Though our beliefs and passions are split between the movements of Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, and Immigration Rights, etc., we are not coming together, which Sheila identifies as a crucially divisive fact of the world today. We hear about one another, we see each other marching for our beliefs, though we don’t know each other. Through her powerful storytelling, she hopes to bridge our differences, guide our passions, and unite under one ubiquitous truth: “there is no love without beauty and justice.” To learn more about her impact, click the link in our bio.

Photos by @shepreebright || Admittedly on the shy side, Sheila was initially drawn to photography due to her own introverted tendencies because it allows her to speak what she sees. When she began photographing The Black Lives Matter movement in 2014, she knew that she was mainly capturing protest imagery, but “wanted to take people beyond that, to show the universal commonalities of all people,” race aside. This proved to be a challenge though, as she found that if a photo features a black person, people cannot “get past the blackness”, even though “we all bleed the same, we all have fear.”⁠⠀ •⁠⠀ This underbelly of universal acceptance is found in all of her work, as she is in a continual pursuit to get us to come together, despite division into our own countless, personal protests. Though our beliefs and passions are split between the movements of Black Lives Matter, #MeToo , and Immigration Rights, etc., we are not coming together, which Sheila identifies as a crucially divisive fact of the world today. We hear about one another, we see each other marching for our beliefs, though we don’t know each other. Through her powerful storytelling, she hopes to bridge our differences, guide our passions, and unite under one ubiquitous truth: “there is no love without beauty and justice.” To learn more about her impact, click the link in our bio. - 7 days ago

19,610 Likes
28 Comments
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#Lr_Texture Photo by @johnmwu || Detours are worthwhile.⁠
Living life spontaneously means going out of your way, if only to see something momentarily. In the comforts of your own home is where you miss the most opportunities. Live life without regrets, welcome the unexpected and take the journey of uncertainty with confidence. These are the experiences that make life genuinely engaging.

#Lr_Texture Photo by @johnmwu || Detours are worthwhile.⁠ Living life spontaneously means going out of your way, if only to see something momentarily. In the comforts of your own home is where you miss the most opportunities. Live life without regrets, welcome the unexpected and take the journey of uncertainty with confidence. These are the experiences that make life genuinely engaging. - 9 days ago

32,854 Likes
105 Comments
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#Lr_Texture Photo by @amitmansharof || I took this picture in Batad Rice Terraces near Banaue, Northern Philippines during a trip around Asia. The area is very remote—it took me 1 flight and 5 hours of driving to get here. My first thought when I woke up in Banaue and looked outside the window was ”amazing.” ⁠
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The area is green, surrounded by tropical forests and flourishing rice terraces. I went on a 3-day trek up the mountains, where I traversed villages, steep cliffs, rivers and of course, rice terraces.⁠
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The 2000-year-old stone rice terraces are so big and beautiful, maybe the best I've ever seen. In the middle of the terraces sits the Batad village with its nice people and unique Ifugao culture.

#Lr_Texture Photo by @amitmansharof || I took this picture in Batad Rice Terraces near Banaue, Northern Philippines during a trip around Asia. The area is very remote—it took me 1 flight and 5 hours of driving to get here. My first thought when I woke up in Banaue and looked outside the window was ”amazing.” ⁠ •⁠ The area is green, surrounded by tropical forests and flourishing rice terraces. I went on a 3-day trek up the mountains, where I traversed villages, steep cliffs, rivers and of course, rice terraces.⁠ •⁠ The 2000-year-old stone rice terraces are so big and beautiful, maybe the best I've ever seen. In the middle of the terraces sits the Batad village with its nice people and unique Ifugao culture. - 10 days ago

23,136 Likes
76 Comments
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#Lr_Texture Photo by @_jujujust_ || With my weaves I try to find the area between tactile textures and visual synesthesia. I want you to touch colors, listen to textures, taste shapes, and perceive colors represented by certain shapes, and vice versa. My purpose is to share this experience with others and hopefully give you some colorful goosebumps.⁠
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While I’m weaving a tapestry, I tend to jump between diverse ideas all at once, like a distracted butterfly. I try to make fast sketches to secure some of the color combinations that suddenly pop into my mind. Sometimes while I’m on a walk, thoughts pop into my head. Sometimes I imagine and interpret a song, smell or landscape. Sometimes I dream about certain textures.

#Lr_Texture Photo by @_jujujust_ || With my weaves I try to find the area between tactile textures and visual synesthesia. I want you to touch colors, listen to textures, taste shapes, and perceive colors represented by certain shapes, and vice versa. My purpose is to share this experience with others and hopefully give you some colorful goosebumps.⁠ •⁠ While I’m weaving a tapestry, I tend to jump between diverse ideas all at once, like a distracted butterfly. I try to make fast sketches to secure some of the color combinations that suddenly pop into my mind. Sometimes while I’m on a walk, thoughts pop into my head. Sometimes I imagine and interpret a song, smell or landscape. Sometimes I dream about certain textures. - 11 days ago

20,242 Likes
33 Comments
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Welcome to #LrInsiderTips. In this first episode, Adobe Evangelist @jkost shares how to make your photos look as dynamic as they felt in the moment of capture. Tune in next month for more insider tricks in Lightroom Mobile.

Welcome to #LrInsiderTips . In this first episode, Adobe Evangelist @jkost shares how to make your photos look as dynamic as they felt in the moment of capture. Tune in next month for more insider tricks in Lightroom Mobile. - 14 days ago

15,611 Likes
52 Comments
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Photos by @debwillisphoto || While focusing on the history of visual storytelling within African American traditions and simultaneously infatuated with beauty, Dr. Deborah Willis has worked to ground the histories of the two concepts into her work. Growing up in her mother’s beauty shop in the 60’s, Deborah found herself surrounded by glamor, observed the ritual of self care, and listened to the way women would speak about their lives within the trusted walls of the beauty shop.⁠⠀
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“I used to sit on the floor and listen to women talk about their lives, their hopes, and their disappointments. I was a kid, but I understood that there was something central and important about that experience,” she shares.⁠⠀
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Typically perched with an issue of LIFE, Ebony, or JET,  Deborah would self-pontificate the “lack of stories [about] women” and knew that she wanted to become a photographer to tell visual stories that she seldom saw or read about. She was about seven years old. From these early experiences sprung a natural direction for her work thereafter: the idea of women embracing their beauty, and communal storytelling that coincides.⁠⠀
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Dr. Willis’ fearlessness and undying passion for photography cannot be silenced. Nor can her thirst for purposeful, impactful storytelling for and by the black community. To learn more about her incredible career, click the link in our bio.

Photos by @debwillisphoto || While focusing on the history of visual storytelling within African American traditions and simultaneously infatuated with beauty, Dr. Deborah Willis has worked to ground the histories of the two concepts into her work. Growing up in her mother’s beauty shop in the 60’s, Deborah found herself surrounded by glamor, observed the ritual of self care, and listened to the way women would speak about their lives within the trusted walls of the beauty shop.⁠⠀ •⁠⠀ “I used to sit on the floor and listen to women talk about their lives, their hopes, and their disappointments. I was a kid, but I understood that there was something central and important about that experience,” she shares.⁠⠀ •⁠⠀ Typically perched with an issue of LIFE, Ebony, or JET,  Deborah would self-pontificate the “lack of stories [about] women” and knew that she wanted to become a photographer to tell visual stories that she seldom saw or read about. She was about seven years old. From these early experiences sprung a natural direction for her work thereafter: the idea of women embracing their beauty, and communal storytelling that coincides.⁠⠀ •⁠⠀ Dr. Willis’ fearlessness and undying passion for photography cannot be silenced. Nor can her thirst for purposeful, impactful storytelling for and by the black community. To learn more about her incredible career, click the link in our bio. - 14 days ago

20,096 Likes
27 Comments
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